9 Ways Drinking Only Water Changes Your Body

There are a number of people who do not like to drink water, and therefore don’t bother with it much. On the other end of the spectrum, there are people who drink it almost, if not absolutely, exclusively.

And somewhere in the middle, there are a number of folks who just don’t drink enough of it. That’s what has brought some to the point of challenging themselves to chug it down like it’s the only thing to drink on Earth. It is the healthiest option, so. . .

To highlight that challenge, we’re examining the outcomes of ditching all other drinks but water. That means no soda, no coffee, no juice, no alcohol, and no milk. If just the thought of that makes you want to cry or roll your eyes, hear us out.

Science backs up the health benefits of water and how you maintain healthy fluid and oxygen levels through adequate intake! Below is a list of the benefits you’ll discover by passing on juice and wine for a while and embracing water as your drink of choice.

  1. Sharper Brain

    Just like the rest of the body, your brain contains water too – 76%. When its cells get thirsty, your cognitive function slows, forcing the brain to work overtime. Studies show that staying extra hydrated improves focus, memory, and alertness.

  2. Supple Skin

    HealthySkinLanaK via Dollar Photo Club

    Your skin is made up of roughly 30% water, so when you’re not hydrated, it looks dry and emphasizes the appearance of wrinkles. Drinking water keeps the skin looking supple, reduces inflammation, and kickstarts waste elimination to reduce breakouts.

  3. Joint and Spine Pain Reduction

    The CDC points out that water helps to keep your joints and spine moving like a well-oiled machine by maintaining a proper fluid balance. Cartilage and spinal discs are composed of a large amount of water, so staying hydrated cuts down on pain and creaky body parts.

  4. Heart Gets Stronger

    Drinking at least 5 glasses of water a day cuts your risk of heart disease in half. Water helps to prevent thick, sluggish blood and clogged arteries from causing heart problems.

  5. Boost Metabolism and Lose Weight

    gluten weight lossPublic Domain Pictures

    Water boosts metabolism by 30%, making it easier to burn fat and calories. Additionally, drinking water before meals can make you feel fuller, helping you to avoid scarfing down high calorie or sugary foods.

  6. Expel Toxins and Increase Your Immunity

    We expel waste through urine and sweat, releasing disease-causing toxins. Clearing out the organs with increased water consumption reduces your risk of getting certain cancers, including bladder, colorectal, and breast.

  7. Get Regular

    Water moves things along smoothly in the colon. When there’s not enough in the body, your bowels become impacted with hard stools. Drink more so you can nip constipation before it can creep in.

  8. Relieve Fatigue

    Tired Woman Working At Desk In Design Studiomonkeybusiness via Deposit Photos

    You know that midday slump that everyone gets? As it turns out, just a tinge of dehydration can cause you to feel tired. Whether you’re moving around at the gym or not, you need to keep your energy and electrolyte levels up by taking large swigs of water throughout the day. Just a loss of 1 – 2% of water in the body can lead to fatigue.

  9. Avoid Headaches

    Dehydration can induce headaches and nasty migraines due to a drop in electrolytes and oxygen in the body. One study even showed that pain lessened for people who upped their water intake by 4 – 6 cups.

 

If you struggle with guzzling enough water, know that it doesn’t have to be plain old tap. You can get fizzy with it, go filtered, doctor it up with fruit, or train your taste buds for a bottled brand. Though the eight glasses per day rule has been lifted, ideally you want to drink about half your body weight in ounces of water.

How much water do you drink a day? Have you dumped soda or juices and are in an exclusive relationship with water?

Sources:
NIH
CDC
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
American Journal of Epidemiology
New York Times