When we think of Thanksgiving, there are some things we can typically count on: Pumpkin pie. Family time. Charlie Brown floating in the Macy’s parade. But the weather, really no matter where you live, can be a bit unpredictable.

While we know late November can err towards some chillier temperatures, but snow is in the forecast for Thanksgiving can be a bit of a downer—especially when you need to travel. And chances are, you do, as Thanksgiving is one of the most heavily traveled holidays of the year.

Unfortunately, this year, there are not one, not two, but three major storms that may impede our turkey eating. If you live in these areas, you’ve been warned:

  1. East Coast

    Big cities such as Philadelphia, New York City and Boston got hit with heavy rainfall the weekend before Thanksgiving, and it may not be ending. Philly even got some snow, with Portland, Maine getting around seven inches—and may be getting more throughout the holiday weekend.

  2. Midwest

    A front is continuing to move east from the Pacific to the Northern Plains over the weekend, with potential snowfall expected the Tuesday before Thanksgiving from the Central Plains to the Upper Great Lakes. In the Southern High Plains, the snow could hit Wednesday and by Thanksgiving Day, it’ll hit the northcentral US. Chicago may have some rain early in the week, but should luck out for Thanksgiving day, as will parts of Wisconsin and Michigan, who may see snow before the holiday as well.

  3. West Coast

    Nope, you’re not even safe if you live in a typically sunny area. Heavy snow is possible over the Sierra, with higher elevations possibly getting as much as three feet of snow beginning on Tuesday, possibly not ending until Thanksgiving. And if you live in Southern California, you may see a lot of rainfall.

If you’re traveling this Thanksgiving and live in any of these areas, we encourage you to keep up to date on the weather warnings near you and keep safe on the road.

Are you traveling this Thanksgiving? Do you think you’ll be affected by weather?