While snow can be inconvenient and downright dangerous at times, it certainly is magical. Everything looks better somehow when coated with the white powder, and for kids (of all ages), it provides endless opportunities for playtime. From snowball fights to snow angels to snowmen, it turns any yard or park into an instant playground.

You don’t have to be a kid to enjoy the snow. During a recent snowfall in Kentucky, Cody Lutz, his fiancee and his fiancee’s sister decided to have a little fun and build a snowman.

The trio used a large tree stump as the base for their snowman, added a classic top hat on their finished masterpiece and posed for a photo. The snowman towers well above them at 9-feet tall. We imagine they must have used a ladder to complete this new friend.

Shortly after creating their snowman, who they named “Frosty,” Lutz returned home to find tire tracks in the yard leading up to the snowman. The stump is now exposed with some of the snow missing from it, and there’s a bumper impression in the snow on the front of the stump.

All of these clues led Lutz to conclude that a car must have tried to run over the snowman. The driver was probably very unpleasantly surprised when instead of smashing through snow, he crashed into an unforgiving stump.

We can only imagine the damage done to the car that crashed into Frosty, but besides some missing snow around the stump, the snowman hardly shows any damage.

Frosty still stands tall with a smile on his face and his stick arms outstretched. The stump prevented him from being demolished. Looks like Frosty got the last laugh.

Lutz posted a picture of Frosty post-car-crash on Facebook saying “This is Petersburg for you. What they didn’t count on, is the massive stump in the center. Life is hard, but it’s much harder when you’re stupid.”

One person commented, “Thats hilarious. Guess there isn’t much else to do in Petersburg than to try to mow over snowmen.”

Another comment reads, “I guess they only paused a moment when they heard him holler stop.”

In an interview, Lutz originally called the destructive driver’s surprise “karma,” but he has since clarified that he doesn’t actually believe in karma. He intended it to mean “payback.” Whatever you call it, we’re pretty sure the driver will think twice before attempting to crash into another snowman.