There’s Now a ‘Smart Diaper’ That Alerts Your Mobile Phone When Baby’s Diaper Needs to Be Changed

Image of baby with diaper sensor onMonit

Nowadays, there’s an app or a gadget to help us out with literally everything. Whether it’s a fan sensor to help you sleep or an app that helps you up your blemishes, help is always just a device away.

We never thought we’d see a tool to detect whether your baby’s diaper is soiled, but here we are. Introducing an innovative Bluetooth sensor that is able to accurately alert parents the moment their baby does their business, and when they need a new diaper.

No longer will you have to go through the motions of putting your nose to your baby’s diaper (hello, sniff test) to tell whether they need a change—this smart diaper sensor will do the dirty work for you.

Developed by a Korean startup company called Monit, the sensor can also be turned into a portable air quality and temperature monitor, which is pretty useful after you’ve got a poopy baby!

Some parents might think a device to tell whether their baby has done their business is a unnecessary, and maybe so for healthy babies. But the idea came from the founder, Tony Park, whose daughter had atopic dermatitis, and one of the requirements was to make sure she was never sitting in a wet diaper.

“I had trouble understanding my babies, because I didn’t know why they were crying, why they were yelling, why they didn’t sleep, so I really wanted to understand their behavior and their surroundings,” TechCrunch reports.

After he submitted the idea to an incubator program and got funding to work on it, the product is finally just about ready to ship this summer in Korea. It will then expand into the U.S. and some of the major Asian markets like China and Japan.

Image of baby with diaper sensor onMonit

So how does it work? The sensor is placed on the outside of the diaper, so the baby isn’t bothered by it at all. It’s then able to detect any urine or feces by monitoring temperature, humidity, and gas.

“It gives instant notification to the parent’s mobile hand cell so that they can understand when is the best time for changing (the) diaper,” said Park. “Parents can understand baby’s status in the meantime, baby’s surroundings, so they can raise their babies with strategy, not by just instinct or a feeling.”

Park has also developed a baby carrier called Bebefit, of which the sensor can also be embedded into. What makes the Bebefit’s unique is its adjustable hipseat, which lets parents shift their baby’s weight, so it’s not constantly on one shoulder or the other—which Park found to be a struggle with his own kids.

“Our idea is very simple but powerful. When you carry a briefcase, you can move it to your right hand and back again when you feel pain,” says Park. “Our hipseat lets you toggle the center of weight on your waist and between your waist and shoulders.”

Now if only there was a device that would actually change our baby’s diaper for us. Maybe some day!

What do you think of this dirty diaper-detecting gadget? Would you ever use it?