Did you tune in to the recent Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show? If so, you likely noticed one very outdated trend–rail-thin models and ONLY rail-thin models.

Now, don’t get us wrong, there’s absolutely nothing wrong with being rail-thin, but when a leading fashion brand casts a roster filled with only models of this rare body type, we think there is something very wrong with the picture. After all, most women who shop at the famed lingerie store have more curves than the boney ladies walking the catwalk; how is the average Victoria’s Secret shopper supposed to select clothing when they have no idea how it will look on their body?

Luckily for the other 99.999% of women out there who don’t have bodies like the celebrated VS models, there are many other lingerie options on the market today. Take Navabi, for instance.

Navabi is a brand based in the UK that caters to women sizes 16 and up and, like most everyone else in the world, it seems to have the same gripes with Victoria’s Secret’s lack of inclusivity.

In a video that launched the day after the famed fashion show, Navabi released its own response on Twitter:

You go, girls! We think Navabi is totally right on; while all women are gorgeous–Victoria’s Secret models included (duh!)–plus-size models should be given just as much love from the fashion industry as their peers. Apparently, Victoria’s Secret’s chief marketing officer didn’t receive this news, though.

In a recent interview with Vogue, the lingerie brand leader managed to offend both transgender and plus-size individuals in one fell swoop. We’re not kidding…

“Shouldn’t you have transsexuals in the show? No. No, I don’t think we should. Well, why not? Because the show is a fantasy,” he said. “It’s a 42-minute entertainment special. That’s what it is.”

In addition to insulting the transgender community, Ed Razek also took aim at plus-size ladies.

“If you’re asking if we’ve considered putting a transgender model in the show or looked at putting a plus-size model in the show, we have,” Razek said.

“We invented the plus-size model show in what was our sister division, Lane Bryant. Lane Bryant still sells plus-size lingerie, but it sells a specific range, just like every specialty retailer in the world sells a range of clothing. As do we. We market to who we sell to, and we don’t market to the whole world. We attempted to do a television special for plus-sizes [in 2000]. No one had any interest in it, still don’t.”

Wow, talk about a company really missing its mark. Something tells us that, if Victoria’s Secret doesn’t change its ways soon, the brand will continue to face some pretty heavy backlash!

We’d love to hear your take on Navabi’s brilliant response. Do you think it was powerful? Should Victoria’s Secret hire plus-size models? What’s your favorite plus-size lingerie brand?