When it comes to fighting cancer, we all know that there’s only so much that can be done beyond lifestyle changes, aggressive treatments, and lots and lots of positive thinking. Having said that, more and more experts are beginning to release findings to the public that say that we can all do plenty when it comes to avoiding cancer in the first place.

Of course, many cancers have strong links to genetics, but lifestyle choices also contribute to illness–and we’re not just talking about folks smoking their ways to lung cancer diagnoses!

As it turns out, a medical doctor by the name of Dwight McKee, MD, a physician who is board-certified in internal medicine, medical oncology, nutrition, and integrative and holistic medicine has a lot to say on the particular subject.

In his book, After Care: The Definitive Self-Care Guide to Getting and Staying Well for Patients After Cancer, the good doctor focuses on giving his cancer patients the tools they need to enjoy healthy remissions, but the great part is, his tips also work to help prevent cancer as well. Here are 5 of his most effective–and easiest-to-follow!–instructions:

  1. Swap out your stress for an activity that enriches your soul

    Do you often find yourself bogged down by stressful occurences that happen in your day-to-day life? If so, Dr. McKee says that putting yourself through this is a big no-no that could ultimately make you sick. He suggests finding a healthy way to unwind, like yoga or hiking–but the key is to make sure that you actually ENJOY doing it. Not a revolutionary sentiment, but definitely a powerful one!

  2. Keep your local mold specialist on speed dial

    According to Dr. McKee, mold contains myotoxins and aflatoxins that “are among the most carcinogenic substances known.” This means that, if you are constantly breathing these deadly spores in, you could be shortening your life span. Take responsibility for your home and take the necessary steps to ensure that the air you’re letting into your lungs is safe and clean.

  3. Hit the gym–consistently!

    In a Harvard Health study, researchers shared that the folks with the highest levels of physical activity also had the lowest instances of the eleven most common types of cancer. The one caveat here is that active folks tend to develop melanomas more often than their sedentary counterparts–so use that sunscreen when you’re running outside!

  4. Spread the love

    Dr. McKee suggests dedicating a good chunk of time to helping people, whether it be through mentoring, volunteering, or even working a job that makes you feel that you’re contributing to the world. “It’s necessary for good health to engage in something on a regular basis that’s rewarding, the Doctor says. “One of the most rewarding activities is helping people.” We couldn’t agree more!

  5. Load up on your vitamin D

    Whether it be from the sunshine–our favorite!– or pill-form, vitamin D is one nutrient that we all don’t get enough of.

Of course, cancer is a very serious disease that must be treated with the help of a physician. Be sure to run all of your plans of action by your trusted doctor before you embark on any major changes on your own. Let’s all stay healthy, folks!

What are your thoughts on Dr. McKee’s cancer prevention tips? Do you follow them yourself? Are you aware of other doctors who give similar advice?