Childbirth can be unexpected. While some moms are in labor for days, other moms give birth pretty quickly and sometimes prematurely.

One pregnant mom boarded a Frontier Airlines plane at Denver International Airport. The plane’s final destination was supposed to be Orlando International Airport, but the plane ended up landing a little bit early.

During the flight, the pregnant mom went into labor. With the help of Flight Attendant Diana Giraldo, the mom gave birth mid-flight.

On the Frontier Airlines’ Facebook page, the airline explained, “the baby couldn’t wait.” They described the labor as “early and unexpected.” Captain Chris Nye commended Giraldo for how she helped the pregnant mom, calling her “calm” and “exemplary.” 

When Giraldo realized that the mom was in labor, she “helped the mother to the back lavatory and assisted the mother in giving birth.”

Instead of landing in Orlando as originally planned, the dispatch arranged for the plane to land at Pensacola Airport. Nye explained, “The whole crew really did a great job. I transferred controls and flying duties to my First Officer as I coordinated the diversion. Dispatch did a great job as well by suggesting Pensacola Airport and getting a gate and paramedics ready for us. This was a job well done, and I was happy to see everyone working together to successfully deliver a newborn on an aircraft!”

After the flight successfully landed, Giraldo “again went above and beyond.” Nye explained, “Diana again went above and beyond after the completion of the flight to coordinate our return to Orlando.”

The mom decided to give the baby the middle name “Sky.” Frontier Airlines explained, “The mom opted to name the baby’s middle name Sky since she was born on our mother and daughter plane tail, Luna and Lilly the Wolves.”

While it is wonderful that the baby was safely brought into the world, and we can assume mother and baby are still doing fine, it is generally not advised for pregnant moms to fly during their third trimester. The Frontier airlines website explains that pregnant passengers should “consult with their doctor on whether it is safe to travel by air, including with due consideration to the possibility of turbulence, cabin pressurization, significantly increased risk of deep vein thrombosis associated with pregnancy, and lack of ready access to medical care. This is particularly important for women in their ninth month of pregnancy, who are urged to obtain an examination from their physician shortly before flying to confirm air travel will be safe. Women with a history of complications or premature delivery should not fly if pregnant. By traveling with Frontier, pregnant women acknowledge and accept these risks.”