This Chef Show Us the Best Way to Flip an Omelet

When making eggs, few things are as impressive as the elusive omelet flip. Being able to flip eggs into the air and have them flawlessly fall back into the pan is an enviable skill, much like tossing pizza dough or speed-chopping an onion. But as impressive as this trick appears, there is an easy way to learn it yourself!

Who better to show us this intense move than a very intense chef! Chef Rene J. Marquis is a celebrated military chef who got a TV break on “Cutthroat Kitchen” in 2013. Now he shares video tutorials like this one, that help chefs all over learn basic skills right at home.

In the video below, you probably guessed it, Chef Rene is showing us how he flips eggs when making an omelet – and boy does he make it look easy.

He starts by heating up a little oil in a small skillet, then he adds a few beaten eggs to the skillet and scrambles them right there in the pan. Once they’re nicely scrambled, he pushes them to the center of the pan and adds a squirt of oil around the outside; this outside ring of fat helps to loosen up the eggs and makes flipping easier.

Chef flips an egg omelet.

The oil alone won’t loosen the eggs enough, so use your spatula to get the eggs clean off the bottom of the pan. Then, the moment of truth: the flip.

Chef Rene Shares that it’s crucial to not just jerk your pan up into the air, there’s a technique that helps the egg get just enough air, without losing control of them completely. All you have to do is roll back and pull the pan at the same time; this will be enough to get the eggs airborne without them getting TOO much air.

That’s it! That’s all you need to do to master the perfect flip, on top of some practice. Besides looking extremely impressive, flipping your eggs is great for your omelet; it’s one of the easiest ways to make sure the eggs are thoroughly cooked and that they’re well-done on both sides. You COULD just flip them in the pan, but this technique has so much more flare and guarantees your eggs won’t break apart.

What do you think of this technique? Do you have a better method for flipping eggs that you’d like to share? Share your thoughts in the comments section below.